ourpcos:

September is PCOS Awareness Month, so this time of year is perfect to bring awareness to PCOS and show support as well. You can bring awareness in many ways; social networking, your local community, PCOS Awareness runs, even PCOS awareness items! (Check out Zazzle’s PCOS Awareness item boutique). Spread this message and bring awareness even if you do not have PCOS, because there may just be someone in your life that does, someone who may not even know they have it! 
Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common female endocrine disorders that is affecting women in numbers as high as one out of ten, although many cases remain undiagnosed because symptoms differ from one woman to another. While one woman may experience a range of symptoms, another may have little to none. PCOS is a condition in which the sex hormones in a female’s body are imbalanced, which can cause cysts on the ovaries, weight gain, changes in menstrual cycle, trouble getting pregnant, and other problems. If left untreated, it can lead to heart disease and endometrial cancer. At this time PCOS is not curable but with medication, exercise, and healthy eating, the symptoms can be treated. 
PCOS Facts
Not all women who have PCOS are insulin-resistant or diabetic.
PCOS is a leading cause in infertility and menstrual irregularity.
Five to seven million of the female population have PCOS.
Less than twenty-five percent of women with PCOS have been diagnosed.
Between thirty to forty percent of women may experience insulin resistance.
PCOS Health Risks
Infertility
Endometrial cancer
Diabetes
Lipid abnormalities
Obesity
Heart disease (4 to 7 times higher)
Sleep apnea
May develop anxiety and/or depression
Symptoms
Weight gain
Dandruff
Oily skin
Cysts on ovaries
High cholesterol levels
Skin discolorations
Elevated blood pressure
Insulin resistance
Repeated miscarriages
Thinning hair
Infertility
Male-type hair growth
Irregular menstrual cycles
Treatment Options
Healthy eating
Weight control/Weight loss
Medication (Metformin, Spironolactone, Clomid (infertility), & birth control are a few that are commonly prescribed)
Regular exercise
Ovarian wedge resection
Laparoscopic ovarian drilling
Associated Names 
Polycystic ovaries
Polycystic ovary disease
Stein-Leventhal syndrome
Polyfollicular ovarian disease 
I have PCOS and by pulling all this information together through research, it gives the option to spread this to family and friends, along with anyone else who comes across it, informing everyone on a female endocrine disease that isn’t well known yet should be.
Whether you are a male, or female without PCOS, spread awareness because someone in your life may in fact have PCOS yet isn’t aware. If you think about it, 5 to 7 million of the female population (1 in 10) have PCOS, and a large majority are not even aware they have it! Although there is not a cure known, it can still be manageable with the proper lifestyle change, but first one must be diagnosed.
If you know someone who has any symptoms listed above, please do not hesitate to speak to them about PCOS because it’s important they get the treatment that is needed to manage PCOS and keep it from getting severe.
For those with low-income/no insurance, check out HRSA or NeedyMeds to find free/low-cost/sliding-scale clinics around your area.

Bring awareness to one of the most common female endocrine disorders.
Be aware of your body and PCOS.
A very dear friend of mine designed the images in this post, so a very big thank you to K.

ourpcos:

September is PCOS Awareness Month, so this time of year is perfect to bring awareness to PCOS and show support as well. You can bring awareness in many ways; social networking, your local community, PCOS Awareness runs, even PCOS awareness items! (Check out Zazzle’s PCOS Awareness item boutique). Spread this message and bring awareness even if you do not have PCOS, because there may just be someone in your life that does, someone who may not even know they have it! 

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common female endocrine disorders that is affecting women in numbers as high as one out of ten, although many cases remain undiagnosed because symptoms differ from one woman to another. While one woman may experience a range of symptoms, another may have little to none. PCOS is a condition in which the sex hormones in a female’s body are imbalanced, which can cause cysts on the ovaries, weight gain, changes in menstrual cycle, trouble getting pregnant, and other problems. If left untreated, it can lead to heart disease and endometrial cancer. At this time PCOS is not curable but with medication, exercise, and healthy eating, the symptoms can be treated.
 

PCOS Facts

  • Not all women who have PCOS are insulin-resistant or diabetic.
  • PCOS is a leading cause in infertility and menstrual irregularity.
  • Five to seven million of the female population have PCOS.
  • Less than twenty-five percent of women with PCOS have been diagnosed.
  • Between thirty to forty percent of women may experience insulin resistance.

PCOS Health Risks

  • Infertility
  • Endometrial cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Lipid abnormalities
  • Obesity
  • Heart disease (4 to 7 times higher)
  • Sleep apnea
  • May develop anxiety and/or depression

Symptoms

  • Weight gain
  • Dandruff
  • Oily skin
  • Cysts on ovaries
  • High cholesterol levels
  • Skin discolorations
  • Elevated blood pressure
  • Insulin resistance
  • Repeated miscarriages
  • Thinning hair
  • Infertility
  • Male-type hair growth
  • Irregular menstrual cycles

Treatment Options

  • Healthy eating
  • Weight control/Weight loss
  • Medication (Metformin, Spironolactone, Clomid (infertility), & birth control are a few that are commonly prescribed)
  • Regular exercise
  • Ovarian wedge resection
  • Laparoscopic ovarian drilling

Associated Names 

  • Polycystic ovaries
  • Polycystic ovary disease
  • Stein-Leventhal syndrome
  • Polyfollicular ovarian disease
     

I have PCOS and by pulling all this information together through research, it gives the option to spread this to family and friends, along with anyone else who comes across it, informing everyone on a female endocrine disease that isn’t well known yet should be.

Whether you are a male, or female without PCOS, spread awareness because someone in your life may in fact have PCOS yet isn’t aware. If you think about it, 5 to 7 million of the female population (1 in 10) have PCOS, and a large majority are not even aware they have it! Although there is not a cure known, it can still be manageable with the proper lifestyle change, but first one must be diagnosed.

If you know someone who has any symptoms listed above, please do not hesitate to speak to them about PCOS because it’s important they get the treatment that is needed to manage PCOS and keep it from getting severe.

For those with low-income/no insurance, check out HRSA or NeedyMeds to find free/low-cost/sliding-scale clinics around your area.

image

Bring awareness to one of the most common female endocrine disorders.

Be aware of your body and PCOS.


A very dear friend of mine designed the images in this post, so a very big thank you to K.

286 notes

happyemil:

becausebirds:

rembrandtswife:

(via 27 Bizarre And Beautiful Chickens)

Evolution is an artist.

mother nature be like “ugh I’m afraid if I color it I’ll ruin it but here’s the lineart anyway”

happyemil:

becausebirds:

rembrandtswife:

(via 27 Bizarre And Beautiful Chickens)

Evolution is an artist.

mother nature be like “ugh I’m afraid if I color it I’ll ruin it but here’s the lineart anyway”

40,879 notes

dean meme || favorite relationships (7/9)

Dean and Cas

"We’re making it up as we go."

11,312 notes

lil-nerdy-dude-with-wings:

lil-nerdy-dude-with-wings:

lookatthesefreakinghipsters:

Can we talk about the fact that Dean drank an entire 26er of hard liquor and was not only still cogent, but went out and drank more alcohol at the bar afterwards?  It’s already been established that Dean has an immense tolerance for alcohol, but even though he might normally have been capable of drinking that amount and not dying/getting really sick/just passing out, he should not have been as cogent and functional as he was at the end of the evening as he was after all that alcohol.

Dean’s alcohol consumption in this episode is actually at an absurd level and I don’t think it’s just to highlight his use of/need for alcohol as a coping mechanism.  I think the immense amount of alcohol he drank with little effect is to highlight that the Mark is changing him, in unanticipated ways.  He’s becoming less human in many ways, he’s more brutal, more animalistic, now he’s not affected by alcohol the way a human is?  While demons have been shown to drink, they’ve never been shown to be affected by alcohol (to my memory).  Could we be looking at the first hints that the transformation to demon!Dean is already underway?

Can we talk about how the camera made love to Dean the entire episode?

Actually I think the shots and camera angles, were pretty much Cas’ eyes following Dean.

(Source: milavish)

16,612 notes

sofapizza:

your sheep looks concerned

sofapizza:

your sheep looks concerned

(Source: ilovepugs)

281,110 notes